A Little Bit of Christmas This and That

Here is a look at some of the Christmas season scenes around my neck of the woods.

This enormous wreath was at Jenkins Arboretum.
Where these leaves were still looking especially colorful.
The door display over a local business.
The local bakery is in the Christmas spirit.
Devon Station was looking good in the afternoon golden hour.

A Sugartown Christmas

Historic Sugartown in Chester County has been featured on my blog before if you would like more information about this location. They usually do seasonal decorations. This Christmas did not disappoint.

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The William Garrett House of 1805.
The Book Bindery.
Behind the Sharpless Worrell House …
along with a close up of these wreaths.
A reflection on the Carriage Museum.
Nearby Sugartown Farm
This lovely display was in front of the General Store.

It’s Still Fall, Folks!

The Autumn color seemed to arrive late this year, even extending well into November in the southern tier of Pennsylvania. Valley Forge National Historical Park was still wearing its Autumn color when I visited. The Park had recently cut back some its extensive meadows. Valley Forge has one of the most extensive meadow habitats along the Northeast Corridor. In additional to occasional mowing, the Park also uses prescribed burns to rejuvenate the habitat from time to time. Let’s let Christmas wait a few more weeks.

Red and orange …
and yellow.
Some of the expansive meadows ready for winter.
Pop of color against the evergreens.
The mowing lines are clearly visible here on the hill.
One of the workhorses responsible with part of its haul.

A Pleasant Surprise

A unexpected event greeted me on my way home from a fairly unsuccessful trip to take some photographs. I came upon a fireworks display in celebration of Exton Community Day at Exton Park. I have no idea if this event is usually at this time of year, but it was nice to see fireworks a little earlier in the evening and with good weather.

A Few From This Summer

I rather liked this panorama shot of Lake Wallenpaupack from the overlook near the dam. When you’re there, look up to your right and you might see an osprey nest in season.

Lake Wallenpaupack

Closer to home, here is a shot from Kirkwood Preserve (in Chester County).

A Better Day for Photography than Birds

A trip to the Octoraro Lake area for some birding did not produce what I had hoped for on the bird front. I saw some ducks and great blue herons and managed to take some of the worst bird photos I have ever attempted. I did better with photos of the surrounding countryside.

One of the spectacular farms of the area.
I usually avoid shooting abandoned buildings, but this is part of a working farm.
Enjoying lunch on a sunny day …
This was the fastest moving Amish buggy I have ever encountered.
While this one was trying to avoid traffic on my way home.

Finally, a shot from northwestern Chester Country, because I like it and don’t have another post to put it in.

The Season Begins

The onset of Spring turns my mind to birds. This is usually the best time of year to look for birds due to the opportunity to see migrating rarities in bright breeding dress. I frequently stop by Marsh Creek State Park when in the area. This is a good spot for bird watching, but I don’t seem to have much luck here. It probably doesn’t help that I am not a morning person and am, therefore, often looking for birds after 11 am. I did see some distant Common Mergansers on the lake, but had to settle for non-bird photos.

Land cruisin’
No entry
I always think I am going to find something here but never do ….

I also stopped by Struble Lake that day. This was more promising this time around. I saw a Savannah Sparrow and a lot of Snow Geese. There was still a fair amount of ice on the lake in early March.

Snow geese and friends

Horned Larks and Goodbye to Winter

Disclaimer: There are no pictures of horned larks in this post

The grapevine (okay, Ebird) continued to carry news of horned larks, Lapland longspurs, and snow buntings in farmers’ fields in northwestern Chester County near Honeybrook. As mentioned in my previous post, I had visited this area over the Winter in connection with a trip to try to find a snowy owl that had briefly been seen nearby. On the first try, I had no luck. This time around I spotted horned larks in small flocks, which is a new species for my life list. This is a very picturesque area with lovely farms that merited more photos.

This young farmer was fertilizing his fields for Spring.

Here’s a better look.

Cattle feeding and soaking up the sun.

Two Amish schoolhouses are close to each other in this area.

Some looks at the farms and fields.

The plastic tubes are there to protect the young trees as they grow along this riparian boundary. The tubes will biodegrade over time.

Pennsylvania “standing stones.”