Some Folks Love this Park

Mt. Pisgah State Park lies in Bradford County not very far west of Towanda. The 1,302-acre park is along Mill Creek, at the base of Mt. Pisgah, with an elevation 2,260 feet. A dam on Mill Creek forms Stephen Foster Lake, named after the famous composer and onetime local resident. The 75-acre lake provides fishing, boating, and skating. The park is also well developed with a swimming pool and snack bar, playground and picnic facilities, and the usual hiking, hunting and winter sports activities.

A nice chat
The dam end of Stephen Foster lake.
A demonstration garden, an atypical offering at a state park.
Nice use of repurposed farm equipment and plants.
More on the Stephen Foster theme.
And not far from the park, we have this charming scene. They’re not your average bears (with bonus barn star).

Spring Has Sprung

My recently untimely absence has been due to a short vacation and an adjustment to a new job situation. After a fairly mild winter, Spring is making an appearance here in eastern Chester County.

Forsythia are some of the earliest flowering shrubs and are great in flower arrangements.
I think almost everyone loves daffodils.
Because you can’t have too many.
The lovely magnolia.
I believe this is also a magnolia variety.
Early azaleas at Jenkins Arboretum.
Winter is still hanging on at Jenkins …

Summer at Middle Creek

I don’t make it to Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area in Lancaster and Lebanon counties all that often during the Summer. Here are a few shots from around the property.

A lovely tiger swallowtail decided to hang out.
Geese can be found at Middle Creek almost any time of year.
The corn is looking good.
Farming is done at Middle Creek. The fields provide habitat and food for some species.
Pennsylvania farm country in a nutshell.
I never really noticed the hills around this area as much as on this trip.
Much to do here other than wildlife viewing.
A glamorous egret interloper with the geese.
Purple wildflowers along this pond.
Lots of wildflowers everywhere ….

Waterfalls and a Slightly Confusing Name

Nestled in the far north of Susquehanna County not far from the New York line, Salt Springs State Park feels like one of the more remote state parks in Pennsylvania. It is well known for its deep gorge with three waterfalls, old growth hemlock trees and the salt spring which gives the park its name. It is unusual among state parks in that it is managed by the Friends of Salt Springs State Park, a volunteer organization. The Friends also own and operate an adjacent tract of land. Prior to becoming a park, Salt Springs was the homestead of the Wheaton family. The park offers hiking, camping, picnicking, and educational programming.

A beautiful waterfall. The bank is eroded away by flooding and it takes some scrambling to reach the falls.
Beautiful spot for a picnic.
Dramatically perched trees along the gorge.
The Barn
An organic garden.
This is a private residence. The Wheaton House is to the left in the back.
A lovely little bridge from the camping area.

I visited on a rainy day which cut short some of my planned activities. I had intended to find the salt spring which is near the main homestead. From looking at photos and video on the internet, this spring is gurgle bubbling up through a pipe in a small hole in the ground. It does not seem like a main feature of the park which bears its name.

The park is lovely, especially along Salt Springs Road.

A lovely view over the fields.
There is a great mix of green here.
A calmer section of Fall Brook.

A Lake and a Pond

Prompton State Park and the Varden Conservation Area are located near each other in northeastern Pennsylvania’s Wayne County. Prompton State Park provides boat launching and picnicking facilities for the 290-acre Prompton Lake, which is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. There are twenty-six miles of hiking trails which surround the lake and a disc golf course.

Morning mists on Prompton Lake ….
A little disc golf by the lake.
A view of the substantial dam.
The west branch of Lackawanna Creek.
Half mast for Memorial Day.

A gift from veterinarian Dr. Mead Shaffer, the 444-acre Varden Conservation Area is in an area that was once a remote section of the state, but which is now beginning to feel pressure from development. The land is conserved as open space with opportunities for low impact recreation and educational use. It is a great place to learn about Pennsylvania’s natural history. There is picnicking by and fishing in the pond. There is also hiking in the two tracts which constitute this conservation area. I visited the Tannery Road Tract.

The lovely pond can be used for fishing.
Morning mists on an unseasonably cool day.
Beautiful irises are indicative of the seasonal flora of this area.

A Little Piece of Paradise

I made two recent trips to Dixon Meadow Preserve in Montgomery County to see a sora (seen) and a yellow crowned night heron (not seen), This Preserve provides some great bird habitat in the suburbs, especially in connection with the adjacent Erdenheim Farm. With its 14 acres rand boardwalk measuring nearly two-thirds of a mile, the Preserve is a haven for birders, walkers and those who simply enjoy the area’s natural beauty

Purchased by the McCausland family in 2009, Erdenheim farm is home to prize winning Cheviot Sheep, Black Angus cattle, and elegant Morgan Horses. Situated on close to 450 acres, Erdenheim Farm remains one of the last sanctuaries of pastoral life within the greater Philadelphia area.

A view of Dixon Meadow Preserve,
A stream wanders through the Preserve and under the boardwalk.
Redbud in bloom.
Erdenheim Farm Black Angus at twilight.

The Groundhog Sticks Her Head Out of the Her Hole

It shouldn’t come as a surprise, that due the corona virus lock down, I haven’t been out much doing photography. I did manage to drive around my local community getting some photos of the spring flowers and flowering trees. I also checked up on two of my local state parks, which were well attended by people glad to get out of the house while maintaining a safe distance from others.

The local; cherry trees are in bloom.
Tulips are always lovely.
This pony at Ridley Creek State Park finds things greener on the other side of the fence.
These horses aren’t bothered by Covid 19.
I love this barn at Hope Springs Farm at Marsh Creek State Park.
It has a great silo.
The horses were enjoying a day in the pasture.
Down at the West Launch a kayaker is getting ready to shove off.
Someone else has a faster way to get around.

Socially distant dispersed outdoor recreational fun was had by all.