Gettysburg on Memorial Day

Memorial Day brought me to Gettysburg National Military Park on my way home from the Cumberland Valley. I had been here a few times when I was young, but it’s been a while since I was there. In additional to being educational and preserving this country’s history, the park is a lovely place for a walk or bike ride. As I am not an expert on military history, I will share some of the views and monuments that I particularly liked, with particular emphasis on farms.

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A cannon on Confederate Avenue.
The State of Louisiana Monument – one of the most imposing.
Part of the Snyder Farm.
Irish Brigade Monument, 63rd, 69th and 88th New York Infantry 14th New York Independent Battery.
A view of the Slyder farm.
The Codori farm.
The Abraham Trostle Farm.
More of the Trostle farm.
A distant view.
The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Memorial.
The Jacob Hummelbaugh farm.
… with some adjacent cannon …

The Historic Pawling Farm

The Pawling Farm is part of Valley Forge National Historical Park and sits on the Perkiomen Peninsula, which is created by a bend in the Schuylkill River near its confluence with the Perkiomen Creek. This area played a critical role in the winter encampment of George Washington’s troops in 1777-78. It was a strategically important avenue of approach from the north to the encampment on the south side of the river and also served as the site of a commissary function that saved the troops from starvation. The National Park Service brochure on the area can be found here.

Currently the property’s main buildings include an old barn, a small home (which currently appears to be in use), a privy building, and the remains of the old mansion. The mansion was lost to fire in 1967 and is now a ruin. There are hiking trails which connect to the rest of the Valley Forge system and a mix of habitats including meadow, forest, wetlands, and vernal ponds.

The old barn is an impressive structure.
A view of the house and barn. You can see here that the barn is a bank barn like the one in Sugartown in my previous post.
The house that remains on the property, apparently the only building still in use.
The area immediately around the buildings is meadow which is cut for hay.
More hay bales, just because I like hay bales.
According to my research, this building was used as a privy.
The privy with the remains of another building behind it.

Here are some overview shots and other views of the farm.